Agricultural Sciences Major (2022)

Developing the future leaders of agriculture

Food and agriculture are at the center of a rapidly changing and growing world, and the challenges we face are some of the most important. The next generation of growers, policy makers, business leaders, innovators and educators are needed to shapethe future of agriculture.

Consistently ranked in the top five universities for agricultural sciences, Cornell's Agricultural Sciences major gives you the flexibility to tailor your studies to meet your unique goals with concentrations in animal science, business management and policy, education and society, organic agricultureand sustainable cropping systems management.

Develop your leadership and critical thinking skills through a first-semester cohort course and gain practical, hands-on experience through lab and field courses, while you learn thescienceof agricultural systems and related environmental and socio-economic issues.

  • Major
  • Transfer

Major inAgricultural Sciences

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

Our Agricultural Sciences program offers a flexible, interdisciplinary major that prepares students to tackle important challenges, from improving their family farms to pursuing careers in policy, education, researchor agricultural business. The major sits at the centerof the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, providing access to all that a public-private research university offers.

With CALS’ individualized approach to agricultural sciences, there is no “typical student.” Our major offers a broad foundation in agriculture, but allows for flexibility, so students can tailor their studies and explore their passions across and beyond the agricultural sciences.

Matching our students’ multi-faceted interests, this major allows for deepening your understanding with specific concentrations of study,in preparationfor careers that require a scientific and integrated understanding of agriculture and food systems.

Major basics

CALS seeks students who maintain a rigorous high school curriculum and demonstrate an outstanding record of academic achievement. Admissions requirements include:

  • 4 Units of English

  • 4 Units of Mathematics (including pre-calculus)

  • 3 Units of Science (biology and chemistry)

  • Also recommended: statistics

  • Agriculture courses are also strongly encouraged

There are two parts to the Agricultural Sciences curriculum for a minimum total of 16 courses. Students gain breadth of knowledge with 12 core courses. Example areas include sustainable agriculture, integrated pest management, genetics, soil, plant, animal and food science, business management and international agriculture.

Students gain depth by choosing one of five possible concentrations involving a minimum of four courses or 12 credits. Prior to their last semester, students also gain practical experience through an internship equal to at least six weeks of full-time work. This structure trains our students to be critical thinkers across the life and social sciences.

To learn more, see the complete curriculum in the Cornell Courses of Study. If you have additional questios, emailagsci [at] cornell.edu.

Life sciences foundation

The Agricultural Sciences major aligns well with college distribution requirements for foundational life sciences knowledge, including:

  • Two courses for a min. of 6 credits in life sciences biology. Example sequences:
    BIOG 1140, Foundations in Biology (fall, 4 credits) and PLSCI 1115, The Nature of Plants (spring, 3 credits) or
    BIOEE 1610, Introductory Biology: Ecology and the Environment (fall, spring, 3 credits)
  • General chemistry with lab. Examples:
    CHEM 1560, Introduction to General Chemistry (fall, 4 credits) or CHEM 2070, General Chemistry I (fall 4 credits)
  • Statistics. Examples:
    STSCI 2100, Introductory Statistics (fall, spring 4 credits) or STSCI 2150, Introductory Statistics for Biology (fall, spring, 4 credits)

To learn more about the courses listed,visit theCourses of Studywebsite.

Students with life science research, graduate study or pre-health interests have the flexibility to expand their foundation with additional coursework. Prospective transfer students may wish to contact the major (mailto:agsci [at] cornell.edu) for assistance in planning or evaluating transfer classes.

Broad agricultural core

This represents the breadth of knowledge across agricultural disciplines. Of the 12 core course requirements, six requirements have choices.

Set common core coursework includes:

(Video) Careers in Agriculture - Science

  • AGSCI 1125 Guided Explorations: Growing You and Your Path in the Agricultural Sciences
  • ENTOM 4440 Integrated Pest Management
  • PLSCI 1101 Plant Science and Systems
  • PLSCS 1900 Sustainable Agriculture: Food, Farming, and the Future
  • PLSCS 2110 Field Crop Systems
  • PLSCS 2600 Soil Science

To learn more about the courses listed,visit theCourses of Studywebsite.


Core course areas with choices:

Students will complete one course from a select list of options in the following six areas:

  • Animal science, choice between nine classes, examples include:
    BIOAP 1100, Domestic Animal Biology (fall, 4 credits)
    ANSC 2500, Dairy Cattle Principles (spring, 3 credits)
    ANSC 3800, Sheep, (spring, 3 credits)
  • Communication or education, choice between 13 classes, examples include:
    EDUC 2410, The Art of Teaching (fall, spring 4 credits)
    COMM 2850 Communication, Environment, Science, Health (spring, 3 credits)
    ILRLR 3300 Advocacy and Debate (fall, spring, 4 credits)
    LEAD 3100 Foundations in Leadership: Skills for Professional Success and Life (fall, spring, 3 credits)
  • Food science, four choices:
    ANSC 2000 Sustainable Food & Companion Animal Systems and Perspectives (spring, 3 credits)
    FDSC 1500 Food Choices and Issues (spring, 2 credits)
    FDSC 200 Intro to Physiochemical & Biological Aspects of Food (fall, 3 credits)
    FDSC 3960 Food Safety Assurance (spring, 2 credits)
  • Genetics, 3 choices:
    ANSC 2210 Introductory Animal Genetics (spring, 4 credits
    BIOMG 2800 Lectures in Genetics and Genomics (fall, spring, 3 credits)
    PLBRG 2250 Plant Genetics (spring, 4 credits)
  • International agriculture, choice between five classes, examples include:
    AEM/FDSC 3290 International Agribusiness Study Trip (spring, 2 credits)
    ANSC 4880, Global Food, Energy, and Water Nexus – Engage the US, China, and India for Sustainability (fall, 3-4 credits)
    PLSCS 4140 Global Cropping Systems and Sustainable Development (fall, 3 credits)
  • Introductory business management, two choices:
    AEM 1200 Introduction to Business Management (spring, 3 credits)
    AEM 3020 Farm Business Management (fall, 4 credits)

To learn more, see the complete curriculum in the Cornell Courses of Study. If you have additional questios, emailagsci [at] cornell.edu.

Students will complete at least one concentration of 12 credits. The five concentrations are:

  • Animal science
  • Business management and policy
  • Education and society
  • Organic agriculture
  • Sustainable cropping systems management

Students often have space and flexibility to complete more than one concentration and may double-count any concentration course towards a minor from across the university.

Students are required to gain practical experience through an agriculturally related internship of at least six weeks of full-time effort that aligns with individual goals.

From the outset of studies, students are encouraged and introduced to career exploration, as well as the tools and resources for conducting a job search. All students are encouraged to use the Agricultural Sciences major’s growing network of alumni connections and strengthen coursework experiences with professional development.

The Agricultural Sciences major has about 100 undergraduates at any given time. As a mid-sized major, this allows us to provide personalized student support. We pride ourselves in nurturing our family-like culture, from our student ambassadors, and friendly, first-name-basis faculty advisors, to the common cohort course that assists withthe college transition and supports academic and career exploration.

Prospective students often ask about the course experience. Many of CALS agricultural production courses are lab and field based, utilizing Cornell’s extensive research and teaching facilities from farms, research fields and greenhouses, to a near-campus teaching winery and orchard. Students also engage in food and agriculture-related international trip courses, clubs and organizations.

The Agricultural Sciences majorprepares graduates to be critical thinkers, who understand the science behind complexissues such as global food supply and security and climate change, while also understanding the global marketplace. We care about our alumni, keeping in through an annual social and LinkedIn group. Alumni frequently serve as mentors for our undergraduates, and we are constantly seeking new ways to foster these vital networking connections.

  • Write and speak clearly, deliver information effectively, and think critically about complex food, agriculture and natural resource issues.
  • Demonstrate interdisciplinary knowledge and competency with the fundamental science and production of plant and animal systems.
  • Demonstrate depth of competency in one or more agricultural disciplines (concentrations).
  • Develop and apply sustainable and productive solutions that address the complex, multidisciplinary nature of food and agriculture challenges both domestically and globally.
  • Demonstrate leadership in agriculture and natural resources.

Transfer Student Admissions

The Agricultural Sciences major is a transfer-friendly program. We work hard to meet each transfer student’s individual needs and align prior coursework with as many curriculum requirements as possible, allowing students to advance with maximum flexibility. Prospective transfer students should connect with the major’s coordinator to receive more information.

Academic Record Required:

  • Strong academic record at the college level. Competitive applicants have at least a 3.0 (B) average.
  • CALSRequired Courseworkshould becompleted or in-progress with a “B” or better before applying.
  • The most competitive applicants are full-time students who have met the GPA and course requirements.

(Or transfers withtwo full-time college semestersof study (post-high school) completed or in progress at time of application):

Required:

  • Two CollegeWriting/English Composition coursesor one writing/composition and Public Speaking
  • Statistics
  • One full academic year of Introductory Biology with labs

(Or transfers withfour full-time college semestersof study (post-high school) completed or in progress at time of application).

Required:

  • Two CollegeWriting/English Composition coursesor one writing/composition and Public Speaking
  • One full academic year of Introductory Biology with labs
  • Statistics
  • General (Inorganic) Chemistry I with lab

Strongly Encouraged (Not Required):

  • Courses that meet theCALS social science and humanities requirementsin Cultural Analysis, Historical Analysis, Knowledge, Cognition and Moral Reasoning, Literature and the Arts, Social and Behavioral Analysis and Foreign Language.

Apply

(Video) Is an Agriculture Degree Worth It?

Learn more about our students and alumni

In the news

Supporting farmers, protecting soil health

Agricultural Sciences major Mikala Anderson ’23 is working on aconcentration in education and society. For the past two summers, she has participated in a summer internship at the Delaware County office of Cornell Cooperative Extension, first as aCornell Cooperative Extension summer internand last summer as part of theDairy Sustainability Key Performance Indicator Project.

  • Read more about Mikala's experience

In the news

More student veterans join a welcoming community

Jenny Cunningham, a former staff sergeant in the Marine Corps, wanted to go back to college for a degree in sustainable agriculture. But as a veteran and at age 40, she wondered if she would really fit in an undergraduate population.

At Cornell, “I was welcomed with open arms,” she said, “and I was really surprised – because it was almost like an instant family.” Cunningham is now a junior transfer student in CALS.

  • Learn more about Jenny's experience

In the news

Lund fellows program supports undergrads and organic agriculture

Agricultural Sciences major Jeremiah Lazo '22 fell in love with agriculture in the fourth grade. A friend had asked Lazo over to his family’s ranch near Edinburg, Texas, where they raised cotton, cattle, sorghum and corn on 300 acres. Soon, and for the next eight years, he was heading to the farm every weekend and summer to help build barns, fix fences and manage cattle.

“I’d wake up at the crack of dawn to head out to the farm and work way past when the sun went down,” Lazo said. “I had other hobbies, but agriculture, farming and showing animals – that was really where my heart was, and I knew that my career would be in the food system.”

  • Learn more about Jeremiah's experience

In the news

Student firefighters answer the call

Most students can drive a car by the time they graduate from college. Not many of them can drive afire truck.

John Gregory ’23 is among the few. An agricultural sciences major, Gregory has been a volunteer firefighter throughout his time on the Hill (and for two years before that, as a high schooler in New York’s Westchester County). Now a junior, he has risen to the rank of lieutenant with the Cayuga Heights Fire Department (CHFD), the all-volunteer force that serves the tree-lined village adjacent to campus that’s home to many Cornell faculty and staff.

  • Read more about John

In the news

Reflections from the next generation of ag educators

Megan Lamb ’22, an agricultural sciences major, participated in a joint summer internship program between theNutrient Management Spear Program(NMSP) and theWilliam H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute.

Lamb’s internship was made possible with funding from the NMSP’sDairy Sustainability Key Indicators Projectrun byQuirine Ketterings, professor of nutrient management and director of the NMSP in the Department of Animal Science in Cornell CALS.

  • Learn more about Megan's experience

In the news

CCE’s role in the future of dairy sustainability

Agricultural science major, Megan Wittmeyer ’22, spent the summer completing a joint internship between theNutrient Management Spear Program(NMSP), run byQuirine Ketterings, professor of nutrient management in the Department of Animal Science in Cornell CALS, and Cornell Cooperative Extension’s (CCE)South Central NY Dairy and Field Crops Team. CCE provided full funding for this internship experience through theCCE Summer Internship Program.

  • Read more about Megan's experience
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Exploring agriculture through hands-on experiences

Through this college-wide interdisciplinary major, you will have access to Cornell’s world-class agricultural resources and facilities. Students gain hands-on experience through labs and course field trips to a number of campus-area farms.

(Video) All About Agriculture Science

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The Cornell University Dairy Research Center houses about 600 dairy cows and an additional 500 head of youngstock. It includes multiple freestall barns, a tiestall-metabolism barn and milking parlor.

Dilmun Hill is a student-run farm that practices sustainable agriculture on campus. The farm provides students with opportunities for experiential learning, group collaboration and research.

Each year, students in the Food Science 1101 class make ice cream for their final project in the Cornell Dairy processing plant.

Students gain hands on experience maintaining and harvesting tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, and basil in our Hydroponic Food Production course.

The Cornell University Insect Collection includes over 7 million insects specimens representing about 200,000 species, or roughly 20% of the world’s described insect fauna.

The CALS Teaching Winery in Stocking Hall includes state-of-the-art fermentation tanks and a modern microbiological and chemical lab.

Cornell Orchards serves as a 22-acre living laboratory providing hands-on experience with fruit production. Focus areas include pomology, viticulture, orchard management and agricultural engineering.

The Guterman Bioclimatic Laboratory contains growth chambers, controlled atmosphere storage rooms, an isolated facility for herbicide and weed science research and adjacent greenhouse facilities.

In the grape research fields at Cornell AgriTech in Geneva, NY, our researchers explore grower needs in the spectrum of grape breeding, best horticultural practices and disease and pest management.

Musgrave Research Farm in Aurora, NY, provides 450-acres of productive, arable land for applied agricultural research, teaching and outreach with a focus on field crops and soil science research.

Careers in agricultural science

Graduates pursue a variety of careers, including food production and marketing, agricultural education in secondary schools, organic farming, cooperative extension and crop consultation.

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Agriculture Business

  • Marketing specialist
  • Dairy nutrition sales and consulting
  • Crop consultant
  • District sales manager
  • Chief innovation officer
  • Director of training and development
  • Financial loan officer
  • Associate produce buyer
  • Marketing project coordinator
  • Management trainee

Education

  • Teach for Americateacher
  • Science teacher
  • Secondary school farm manager

Environment

  • Sustainability and energy fellow
  • Energy project technician
  • Soil scientist

Farming

  • Herd health assistant
  • Field manager
  • Crop operations manager
  • Dairy farm manager
  • Food safety manager
  • Poultry farm manager
  • Livestock operations manager
  • Greenhouse manager
  • Agronomist
  • Assistant grower
  • Organic farming certification specialist

Research

  • Research assistant
  • Trials manager
  • Field technician
  • Plant breeding technician

More

  • Equine dentist
  • NYS Department of Ag & Markets fellow
(Video) The Master of Agricultural Sciences

Contact us

The Richard C. Call Director of Agricultural Sciences

Dr. Frank Rossi
G47 Plant Science Building
Phone: (607) 255-9998
Email:fsr3 [at] cornell.edu

Coordinator

Kari Richards
707 Bradfield Hall
Phone: (607) 255-0660
Email:ksu2 [at] cornell.edu

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Explore your opportunities

A CALS education goes beyond the classroom and gives students frequent opportunities to apply what they learn in real-world settings.

  • Admissions
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FAQs

What is the major of science in agriculture? ›

Agricultural Science is a broad program that exposes students to agriculture in terms of the sciences as well as the economic and social science disciplines that are integral to the industry. Some aspects that students are exposed to include agricultural production, soil and water conservation, research, and business.

Which major is best in agriculture? ›

These best agricultural degrees at the baccalaureate level include agroecology, food systems, environmental sciences/studies, biological sciences, international development, animal science, nutrition & food sciences, and dietetics, nutrition, and food sciences, among others.

What is studied in agricultural science? ›

agricultural sciences, sciences dealing with food and fibre production and processing. They include the technologies of soil cultivation, crop cultivation and harvesting, animal production, and the processing of plant and animal products for human consumption and use.

What are the best courses in agricultural science? ›

Some top specializations are listed below:
  • Agronomy.
  • Horticulture.
  • Floriculture.
  • Agriculture Economics.
  • Forestry.
  • Plant Breeding.
  • Agriculture Genetics.
  • Hydroponics.

What jobs can you get with an agricultural science degree? ›

Possible Careers:
  • General Agricultural Manager.
  • Agricultural production manager.
  • Winemaker.
  • Cellar manager.
  • Agricultural extension officer.
  • Agritourism.
  • Research, education and training.
28 Oct 2015

Is agriculture hard to study? ›

ANSWER (1) No, it isn't hard. 1. The B.Sc in agriculture is more of a practical course so it's not that hard to study.

Is agricultural science a good major? ›

If you're wondering to yourself, is agriculture a good major to pursue? The answer is absolutely yes! While it isn't completely necessary to have a degree in agriculture to land many agriculture jobs, it can place you in a better position and opens up other possible opportunities in the industry.

What is the difference between agriculture and agricultural science? ›

Agriculture is the practice and act of planting crops and racing livestock. Agricultural science, on the other hand, allows researchers to study the science behind it. In that way, it's an even broader term than agriculture.

What are the 4 types of agriculture? ›

There exist four main branches of agriculture, namely;
  • Livestock production.
  • Crop production.
  • agricultural economics.
  • agricultural engineering.

Can I study agriculture without maths? ›

No, Mathematics is not a compulsory subject for BSC in Agriculture. You can leave maths but make sure you are good in physics , chemistry and biology. To get a seat in BSC Agriculture , you should be science student, with PCB or PCM.

Why should I study agriculture? ›

If you're keen to learn more about animal welfare, the production of food and the preservation of the countryside, agriculture courses will introduce you to the fundamentals and the new techniques being used to sustain production.

What do agricultural scientists do? ›

Agricultural and food scientists typically do the following: Conduct research and experiments to improve the productivity and sustainability of field crops and farm animals. Create new food products and develop new and better ways to process, package, and deliver them.

Is agriculture a good career for girls? ›

Yes offcourse. There are lot of job opportunities for girls as well. In Agriculture, boys are preferred for marketing jobs and girls for the desk job. Many of them have done PG and then got selected in various agriculture institute which are run by ICAR.

How many years does it take to study agricultural science? ›

The Bachelor of Science (BSc) in Agriculture is a four year undergraduate degree programme with its first cohort enrolled in 2016. The programme fits under the hard-applied and life system category. Scientific knowledge in Agricultural production is a critical skill identified in the National Development Plan (NDP).

Can I study agriculture without biology? ›

No, biology is not required for Bsc students. You can take the ICAR exam whether you have a degree in math or biology.

What is the highest paying agricultural job? ›

Here are 15 of the highest-paying jobs in agriculture:
  1. Farm manager. National average salary: $48,093 per year. ...
  2. Forester. National average salary: $48,380 per year. ...
  3. Agricultural specialist. ...
  4. Water treatment specialist. ...
  5. Food technologist. ...
  6. Environmental scientist. ...
  7. Water resources engineer. ...
  8. Operations manager.

How much do agricultural scientists make? ›

Agricultural Scientist with: 1-4 years of experience earns an average total compensation (includes tips, bonuses, and overtime pay) of R180 000 – R285 000 per annum. 5-9 years of experience earns an average total compensation of R380 503 per annum.

Does agriculture have math? ›

Farmers use mathematical skills and science in their day-to-day farm activities. For example, farmers use mathematical skills to estimate the seed amount needed, the cost to plant their crop based on the area of cultivable land they possess, to purchase equipment or tools needed and make payments for various purchases.

Can I study agriculture without physics? ›

Sorry, it is not possible to get admission in BSc Agriculture without studying Physics and Biology subjects. Eligibility to study BSc Agriculture course is a pass in 10+2 with at least 50% marks with Physics, Chemistry and Biology / Mathematics subjects from a recognized board.

What do agriculture students do? ›

If you want to study Agriculture, you will deal with agricultural processes and their conditions. This includes the cultivation of renewable raw materials and the production of food for humans and animals. The goal is to produce food efficiently and in an environmentally friendly way.

What are the disadvantages of agriculture? ›

Disadvantages Of Industrial Agriculture
  • Deforestation. Intensive farming causes soil degradation and leads to the expansion of new lands. ...
  • Pest and weed resistance to chemicals. ...
  • Soil degradation. ...
  • Impact on natural habitats. ...
  • Water pollution. ...
  • Climate change.
4 Dec 2020

What is a career in agriculture? ›

What are agriculture careers? Agriculture careers are professional paths related to farming, cultivation and animal husbandry. These career paths involve everything from growing crops and nurturing the soil to raising livestock like cattle, pigs and chickens.

What are 3 major areas of agriculture? ›

There exist four main branches of agriculture, namely; Livestock production; Crop production; agricultural economics; agricultural engineering.

Is Ag science hard? ›

The agriculture major is not particularly hard. Definitely, it's not as challenging as STEM and healthcare majors. But since it's an interdisciplinary field, encompassing anything from biology, chemistry, economics to marketing, agriculture majors have to study very well in order to earn a bachelor's degree.

What are the 7 branches of agriculture? ›

Agriculture is broadly divided into five areas called branches of agriculture. The five branches are; agricultural engineering, agricultural economics, animal husbandry, horticulture and agronomy.

What are the two types of agricultural science? ›

Currently, agriculture is divided into two different types, including industrialized agriculture and subsistence agriculture.

What are the five skills in agriculture? ›

Among the most important skills in agriculture there is interpersonal skills, analytical skills, management skills, technological skills, problem solving skills such as the ability and the knowledge of what causes post harvest skills and reduction of the same.

What subjects are needed for agriculture? ›

Agriculture courses are typically offered as a Bachelor of Science (BSc Agriculture), and they are highly interdisciplinary, requiring students to have a strong understanding of both natural and social sciences, as well as biology, environmental sciences, chemistry, economics, and business and management.

How many subjects are there in agriculture? ›

The major BSc Agriculture subjects are Plant Genetics, Agricultural Meteorology, Food Technology, Horticulture, Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Entomology, Extension of Agriculture, Genetics, Soil Science, Agricultural Economics, Plant Breeding, Plant Pathology, Agriculture Engineering, Sericulture, to name a few.

Can I study agriculture without physics and maths? ›

As per your query, for pursuing Course in Agriculture Science you need to have knowledge of Physics, Chemistry, Maths and Biology.

Are food scientists happy? ›

At CareerExplorer, we conduct an ongoing survey with millions of people and ask them how satisfied they are with their careers. As it turns out, food science technologists rate their career happiness 3.1 out of 5 stars which puts them in the bottom 36% of careers.

Is food science a good career? ›

Salary possibilities – A degree in food science offers many opportunities to earn top-dollar salaries. The median salary in 2011 for people with a B.S. in food science was $80,000 and even higher for those with graduate degrees. Median starting salaries were $44,000.

What do you call an agricultural scientist? ›

Professionals of the agricultural science are called agricultural scientists or agriculturists.

What is the importance of science in agriculture? ›

The main role of science in agriculture has been to help us generate novelties that allow us to produce more with less land and less effort. Results have been spectacular.

What is BS agriculture major in agronomy? ›

The Bachelor of Science in Agriculture major in Agronomy program (BSA-AGRO) is designed to provide knowledge and skills in agroforestry and environmental management. The program includes topics in plant science, animal science, landscape and environmental management.

What are the 4 types of agriculture? ›

There exist four main branches of agriculture, namely;
  • Livestock production.
  • Crop production.
  • agricultural economics.
  • agricultural engineering.

What are the 7 branches of agriculture? ›

Agriculture is broadly divided into five areas called branches of agriculture. The five branches are; agricultural engineering, agricultural economics, animal husbandry, horticulture and agronomy.

What is the difference between agriculture and agricultural science? ›

Agriculture is the practice and act of planting crops and racing livestock. Agricultural science, on the other hand, allows researchers to study the science behind it. In that way, it's an even broader term than agriculture.

What do agricultural scientists do? ›

Agricultural and food scientists typically do the following: Conduct research and experiments to improve the productivity and sustainability of field crops and farm animals. Create new food products and develop new and better ways to process, package, and deliver them.

What are the two branches of agriculture? ›

Crop Science- Deals with economic plants . e.g., rice, jute, potato etc. Animal husbandry- Deals with animal production, e.g., cattle, buffalo, goat, poultry etc.

What are the subject in Agriculture? ›

The major BSc Agriculture subjects are Plant Genetics, Agricultural Meteorology, Food Technology, Horticulture, Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Entomology, Extension of Agriculture, Genetics, Soil Science, Agricultural Economics, Plant Breeding, Plant Pathology, Agriculture Engineering, Sericulture, to name a few.

What agricultural engineers do? ›

Agricultural engineers solve problems concerning power supplies, machine efficiency, the use of structures and facilities, pollution and environmental issues, and the storage and processing of agricultural products.

Is agronomy a good degree? ›

A degree in agronomy can lead to a wide range of professions, and many jobs for agronomists are based in research, management, academia and consulting. Some specific job titles include crop research technician, soil testing technician and seed analyst.

What are the five skills in agriculture? ›

Among the most important skills in agriculture there is interpersonal skills, analytical skills, management skills, technological skills, problem solving skills such as the ability and the knowledge of what causes post harvest skills and reduction of the same.

What are the 11 types of agriculture? ›

Top 11 Types of Agricultural Practices
  • Pastoral Farming.
  • Arable Farming.
  • Shifting Agriculture.
  • Mixed Farming.
  • Nomadic Agriculture.
  • Sedentary Agriculture.
  • Subsistence Farming.
  • Commercial Agriculture.
4 Jan 2021

Which department is best in agriculture? ›

Some of the highest paying agriculture jobs are:
  • Environmental Engineer. ...
  • Agricultural Lawyer. ...
  • Agricultural Operations Manager. ...
  • Animal Geneticist. ...
  • Agricultural Engineers. ...
  • Agronomy Sales Manager. ...
  • Bioinformatics Scientist. Average annual salary: INR 800,000. ...
  • Agricultural Economist. Average annual salary: INR 828,744.
15 Apr 2021

What are the major activities in agriculture? ›

The followings are forms of agricultural activities in the communities that different people involve in:
  • Cultivation and growing of crops.
  • Rearing of livestock.
  • Rearing of fish (fishery)
  • Salving of farm produce.
  • Horticulture.
  • Rearing of snail/Heliculture.
  • Apiculture/bee keeping.

Is Agricultural Science? ›

Agriculture is the art and science of cultivating the soil, growing crops and raising livestock. It includes the preparation of plant and animal products for people to use and their distribution to markets.

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